Posts Tagged ‘fantasy’


Runewars: The Miniatures Game is Final Fantasy Games’ newest big game system, and it is looking to be huge. Set in the Runebound universe, players fight for dominance on the battlefield, using sword and spear, magic and huge beasts to vanquish each other, and rule the fantasy realm of Terrinoth.

First things first, I know absolutely nothing about the Runebound Universe, and so this review is likely to miss a few marks and infuriate some die-hard fans. Sorry! Feel free to track me down and message me incorrect facts about things I like!

Runewars is an interesting hybrid of a game. Mixing troop-based ground combat with the Flight Path System used in games such as X-Wing, it presents itself as something familiar to fans of existing games, yet different enough to not feel like a simple re-skin. Much like games such as X-Wing and both variants of Attack Wing, this starter set contains enough for two starter forces, one of the noble Daqan Lords (read: generic high-fantasy humans) and the other re-animated forces of Waiqar the Undying (read: skeletons, monster worms and other gooey nasties), and all the miniatures, dice, tokens and assorted gubbins needed to addict you and and a friend to your newest set of plastic crack.


Opening up the hefty box, we are presented with three booklets and some cardboard sprues full of token style things. We immediately fling those to one side, because Holy Tolkien, this thing has some beautiful miniatures! On a quick look, there’s forty-six assorted soldiers and cavalry and things, and two huge monsters. All of them have some exquisite detail, and I am immediately drawn to something called a Rune Golem. It’s a big rock-like man-thing with tasty looking swords and the box art tells me that it has an internal blue glow, and it is very tempting to just stop this review right now and go paint it. No. I won’t. I’ll finish this first. I hope you understand how tough this is for me.

Unlike some other FFG titles, the models in this set come unpainted and need some assembly. 

The tokens are nicely designed, all in cardboard, as are the movement templates and range ruler. The dice are 8-sided, and contain some nice custom symbols.

Back to the three booklets, we have Learn to Play, Rules Reference and Lore Guide. I’m a big fan of this format, as it’s a really good way to get into the game. Learn to Play gives you the basics of the system, how to build a force, how to move, how to fight, and a simple one-on-one skirmish scenario. It introduces some more complex elements, but focuses on getting you to grips with how to play the game. The Rules Reference is a wonderful idea. I’ve seen it in other FFG releases, and it’s the closest thing to an “argument settler” that you’re going to get. What happens is my Rune Golem flanks your Archers? It’s in the book. What if I can’t work out how many dice to roll? That’s in the book too.The Lore Guide is pure chrome, and if the other books introduce you to the game, this introduces you to the world that that game exists in, and the factions at war within it.


I’m not going to dive too in-depth into the rules, that’s what the rulebook is for, but I’ll try to convey the general ideas. 

Each unit in your army has a double dial thingy that sets what that unit will be doing that round. It doesn’t define what direction the unit will be moving in, like X-Wing, but defines what type of action that unit will perform, such as moving, attacking and shooting. The second dial can modify the first, adding attack dice, bolstering defence and the like.

Movement uses movement templates almost exactly like every other game that uses the Flight Path system, to guide the position of your troops. The difference comes when one unit meets another. All the other versions are based in space or aerial combat, and the aim is not to bump into your opponent, but to line up clever shots and angles on them. This is not so in Runewars. You actually want to crash into your opponent, charging into their forces and attacking them head on, or even forcing a flanking attack, catching a unit unawares. This is the largest difference, to me, from Runewars‘ contemporaries, and it adds a small amount of complexity. Troops perform a function called “squaring up” where they literally form lines against each other, and this doesn’t use any kind of movement template, therefor allowing for exact positioning, and a freer range of movement on the battlefield.


As is standard, troops are bought with points, and given upgrades such as special weapons and character traits. This set contains plenty of such upgrades, and it doesn’t take long to spot some great and effective combos.

Again, I’m really breezing over the rules here as I don’t have a tonne of games under my belt, but it also includes effects such as Boons and Banes, which can help or hinder your troops, panic reactions, and varying levels of magic, that can ruin the best laid plans, or pull victory from a seemingly definite defeat.

In summary, Runewars seems to be a very in-depth, rewarding experience. In terms of complexity, it definitely ranks above X-Wing, in a similar area to D&D: Attack Wing or Star Wars: Armada. It’s not, by any means, a difficult game to learn, but keeping track of the various multipliers and game effects at once will take some diligence, and I doubt the rule book will be far from hand for quite a while. If this sounds like a negative, it really isn’t, it’s actually to the strength of the game; you won’t feel like there’s nothing left to master any time soon, and it will keep you coming back to try new tactics time and time again.

Realistically, the price tag may seem a little scary to fans of X-Wing and Star Trek: Attack Wing, but the contents are not comparable. Both space games contain three miniatures. Runewars contains many multi-part, multi-size characters screaming for customisation. Which is what I’m off to do right now.

Can I Fit LEDs in a Rune Golem?/10
Ömer Ibrahim is a regular contributor to Suppressing Fire and you can check out his modelling work on Facebook and Instagram.

Omer Ibrahim digs in to the new Conan board game, to find out what is best in life, but discovers just how little he really knows about Conan the Barbarian.