The first expansion set for All Out War feels like a bit of a backward step. It is a little unusual in that you don’t need a copy of the main box in order to play it, but the rulebook included is almost a carbon copy of the “Read this first” quick start rules that come with the core set. Looks like a cash-in at first, as this is the only way to get a “Governer” character for the game, but in the context of the comics theme that Mantic have implemented so well it makes perfect sense! What I hadn’t realised until recently was that the release schedule for AOW is based around graphic novel order, which makes this set a prequel of sorts, being as it is based around the two prequel novels, “The Road to Woodbury” and “Rise of the Governer”.


The solo rule set takes the form of a step-by-step introduction to playing AOW. Over the course of three scenarios, rules are gradually added in to ease a beginner into the game, starting with no guns and limited actions and leading up to nearly the full rule system. The box includes full sets of event, equipment and supply cards (themed for a solo game), dice, templates, scenery and range ruler, counters, 5 walkers and reference card, and a Brian Blake model and survivor card.


“Hang on,” I hear you cry, “But surely the Governer’s name is Philip Blake…?” 

This is true. And also not true. If you haven’t read the novels, I suggest you start there, as the scenarios are based on the pre-Governer days of Brian Blake contained within these very accessible tomes. (The stories are actually quite good, even if the concept of the walkers in the books leaves a little to be desired) The game doesn’t give away any spoilers, and doesn’t require you to read the books, but it adds to the flavour if you have. 


The first scenario starts with a very basic setup, a defined 10″ square (I used some of my Battle Systems clip-together card terrain for this), three walkers, three supply counters and Brian. The event deck is slightly limited, as is the supply deck (guns are removed) by the presence of a walker symbol in the top right corner, exactly like the quick start rules in the core box. In fact this is the same scenario as the first one in that book, but with one character instead of two. The rules introduce us to the basic turn sequence and key concepts (NOISE, threat, and walker movement), as well as the melee combat system, and basic actions.It’s a pretty straight forward gear-grab, with pretty limited options, and barring some horrendous dice rolls you should breeze through this one. You start with no equipment, so your first face-off with a walker is pretty daunting, but once you pick up a weapon from the supply deck you begin to feel a little safer. My first pick up was a tire iron (one extra white dice in combat – nice!) and it was pretty easy going from there. If you’re careful you can reach a supply counter without getting grabbed by one of the dead, but some of the event cards force them towards you so it’s unlikely. With a low threat level and small playing area, this scenario is over pretty quickly. So it’s on to part two.


Scenario 2 widens the play area to 15″ square (time to re-clip that terrain…), and adds scenery, the rest of the supply cards (the gun and ammo), and rules for shooting, MAYHEM and the “Hold Nerve” action. Once again, it’s a grab the supplies and run game, but this time you start with a weapon and there are five supply counters to collect. I was expecting to breeze through this one too, but a couple of dodgy dice rolls (where the hell are the head shots when you need them!?) left me constantly trying to get away from walkers, which dragged the game out over a few extra turns until the threat maxed out. You lose!!!! Tougher than it looked, the relentless rise of the threat level is a killer mechanic. It goes up when MAYHEM is caused, usually through gunfire, when there are models engaged in melee at the start of the melee phase, and via the event cards. The only way to bring it down is to Hold Nerve, which takes an action and reduces threat by one on a 50-50 dice roll! Certainly puts the player up against it! So let’s see how part three goes.


Scenario Three uses the same play area size and game components, and adds rules for equipment slots, the make NOISE action, and being bitten! But at least this time you get to go tooled up with a full set of equipment: Gun, knife, leather jacket and bandages. During this game Brian has to capture four walkers and bundle them onto his truck, rules for which are supplied as scenario-specific. After set-up and a couple of turns, during which I had captured two walkers and unceremoniously dumped them into the waiting vehicle, I began to think this one would be a push-over. 

Oh no. 

Another few turns in, with walkers piling into the game via the event cards, the threat level rocketing, and dragging a struggling walker halfway round the playing area to avoid the shambling onslaught, I was bitten! I got a third walker in the truck, but time, walkers and infection overcame me, and the threat maxed out again. Game over.


Overall it was a reasonable experience. The third scenario was interesting with it’s capture not kill idea, and it’s good to get “The Governor” as a character, even if he is a shadow of the madman to come. And the five walkers included are all original, so no doubles yet! But there are plenty of niggles. While the rules build up over time, they never get to the complete rule set found in the core set, and even at the end still feel like a beginner set. I had to refer to the main rules for a clarification at one point, something I wouldn’t expect to do with a stand alone box. Where there is a standard set of dice added you are supplied with a panic dice which there are no rules for here. The “Solo” event deck is mainly a re-worded pack with one different card. The supply deck is a half size pack with one different weapon, and has “keywords” included, which again have no rules in this box. For me, it really needed to include a few more differences.

 So would I recommend it? For an absolute beginner the gradual building of the rules works well. As in the main rule book it is well laid out, with plenty of tutorial side bars to explain what’s going on. But once you work through it you will want to get the main box anyway to play with the complete rules. If you already own the core set it will feel like a step back, rather than a separate entity, as you will have a near carbon copy of the rules. It might be best to look at it as a large booster pack with the extra accessories to keep as spares as well as the miniatures. But it’s going to feel a little pricey on that front.

As an aside, I’d like to say R.I.P. George A. Romero, without whom (despite his opinion of The Walking Dead!) none of this would have existed.

Officially in mourning. 

David Mustill

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Brad, Ian and Joe unbox, discuss and review the new What If? series for Heroclix!

It’s big, it’s ugly, it’s influential, and it needs a special base, Jabba the Hutt has arrived in X-Wing , and he brought his C-ROC Cruiser with him!

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At long last the Scum and Villainy faction get an Epic ship, and it comes absolutely packed with content. So packed, in fact, I don’t think I could cover everything in the release in one reasonably sized review, so forgive me if I miss something, or don’t give it enough attention.

The expansion is, really, two fold. The obvious component is the C-ROC Cruiser itself, but it is also flanked by an M3-A Interceptor. The M3-A is the same as it’s previous release, with a cool new paint job, representing the new pilot Quinn Jast. The C-ROC on the other hand is obviously a brand new model. Reminiscent of Jabba’s Sail Barge, and with all of its battle damage and weathering, it’s a great model, and it feels like it belongs in the Star Wars universe. The guns turn, too. Bonus points.

In gameplay, the C-ROC is a single-section epic ship, like the Rebel Transport, though a bit more focused on firepower. With ten hull and four shields, it actually has fewer hit points than something like the Imperial Decimator, but it also has the Recover action, as well as the Reinforce, Target Lock and Jam actions. In terms of upgrades, it can take two Crew, one Hardpoint, one Team and three Cargo. The C-ROC can become one of three ships, depending on what title you equip to it. The Broken Horn allows the ship to deflect more damage, the Insatiable Worrt helps the ship keep generating energy as it regenerates shields, and Merchant One gains the vessel an extra Crew and Team upgrade slot, at the cost of one Cargo slot.

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In terms of upgrades that can only be used in Huge ships, there’s six different cards, one of which can only be used on the C-ROC Cruiser itself. The Heavy Laser Turret is similar to the Heavy Laser Cannon in standard play, throwing four dice at an enemy, and Quick-Release Cargo Locks are also useable by the GR-75 Rebel Transport, allowing you to change up the layout of the battlefield by dumping some debris is everyone’s way.

Every huge expansion before this one seems to have brought along something important for standard play, and the C-ROC is no exception. The Rebels got the Stressbot, R3-A2 and damage avoider C-3PO, the Empire has Agent Kallus and the Meta-shaking Emperor Palpatine, and if Scum and Villainy needed any boosts, they just recruited Cikatro Vizago and Jabba the Hutt.

Vizago is a crew upgrade worth zero points. Equipping him allows you to swap around Cargo or Illicit upgrades during a battle, for upgrades you didn’t actually equip during the building of your squad. I’ll admit, when this was first announced, I though that this new concept of actually bringing in components from outside the game would completely break the way things worked. The ability to just bring all the cards you have and swap them out as the game goes on just seemed ridiculous. Since then, however, I’ve had the chance to play a reasonably high-level player who was using this  upgrade, and whilst it did make some fun shenanigans happen, it didn’t ruin the game at all. Bonus points.

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Jabba is suitably over the top and potentially game changing. He costs five points, and takes up two crew slots, like Palpatine, meaning that only one ship in standard play, The Hound’s Tooth, can equip him. When you do, you place one Illicit token on every Illicit upgrade you have across your entire squad, and any time you are instructed to discard that card, you may instead discard the token, essentially turning a one-shot Upgrade into a two-time use. Two Rigged Cargo Chutes will drastically change what a map looks like, two Burnout Slams make you incredibly predictable, and two  “Hot Shot” Blasters essentially make any ship into a little turret.

As I mentioned before, the M3-A Interceptor gets a boost in this expansion, including four new Unique Pilots.

When Genesis Red acquires a target lock, he also gets the same amount of Focus and Evade tokens as the ship he locked. Quinn Jast can turn off his weapons for a round to regenerate a spent Missile or Torpedo, meaning that in theory they become infinite. Inaldra can spend shields to re-roll any amount of dice, and if Sunny Bounder rolls any dice and all of the results match, he adds another of the same result. Costing the same as the cheapest generic pilot without a pilot skill, I can see him becoming a solid “Eh, why not?” choice.

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As well as new pilots, the M3-A also receives a new title in the form of the “Light Scyk” Interceptor. This upgrade reduces the cost of the M3-A by two points, making it one of three cheapest ships in the game, alongside the Z-95 Headhunter and the TIE Fighter. It also makes all of your Bank Manoeuvres into Green Manoeuvres, but at the cost of not being able to take any Modification Upgrades and the fact that all damage cards the ship receives will be dealt face up. Of course, with only one shield and two hull, it tends to blow up as soon as it is touched anyway, so it won’t be a major concern. Six copies of this upgrade are included, meaning you won’t need to buy more than one C-ROC to run a swarm of little exploding Interceptors.

Also included is a re-print of the “Heavy Scyk” Title, with its new wording. The old card is still legal, but this is a nice touch.

Also included is the ARC Caster, a dual card cannon that needs charging between shots, and can chain damage to multiple ships, including yourself if you don’t watch where you’re firing it.

Rounding out the new upgrades is the Pulsed Ray Shield, a Modification that allows you to receive an Ion token to regenerate a shield. It can be used by both the Scum and Rebel factions, but only by ships that have a shield value of one, presently meaning only the M3-A and the HWK-290, with only the HWK being available to the Rebellion.

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All in all, the C-ROC is a solid release. There’s nothing in it that will blow the game wide open, other than the fact that Scum and Villainy can actually compete properly at Epic level now,   but plenty that will add new experiences and combinations to the game. The M3-A is a great little ship, but in all my tournament games I have only ever faced it once. I expect that to change with this release, which is good. Old ships should be just as present on tables as new ones. As a pretty dedicated Rebel player, I can’t say that the C-ROC is an essential purchase, neither can I imagine it is for an Imperial player. For the die-hard Scum player however, the ability to bring your faction to 300 point games cannot be overlooked, and neither can many of the contents of this expansion, particularly Vizago and Jabba. If you can afford this big ugly lump, go for it, you won’t regret it.

In Return of the Jedi, Jabba’s slimy sound was made with a bowl of melted cheese/10


Ömer Ibrahim is a regular contributor to Suppressing Fire and you can check out his modelling work on Facebook and Instagram.

Brad, Joe and Ian unbox, discuss, test and review the latest Fast Forces for Heroclix, the Marvel Knights set. Daredevil, Luke Cage, Iron Fist and Jessica Jones are joined by Elektra and The Punisher!

Plus, full, uncut gameplay!

Joe, Ian and Brad are back to discuss, unbox, test and review the Deadpool and the Mercs for Money Fast Forces set for Heroclix! Check out the review above, and check below for the uncut playtest footage: 

I would like to be upfront from the start: I am not the biggest fan of Mantic games. Their multi-part plastic miniatures are durable, but fairly basic, and playing Kings of War felt like a more simplistic Warhammer. So far not good, and as first impressions last, I have not had any call to go back to check out any of their other products. So, then, they go and get the I.P. for the comics version of The Walking Dead. One of the best comic series of all time, loved by millions, it takes a brave move to attempt to bring it to the tabletop. Can they put out a decent game, as well as keping fans on side?

The short answer is: Abso-bloody-lutely!

Mantic have kept the rules simple, a basic skirmish level game with the now-obligatory custom dice, card events, and A.I. walkers to enable both solo and multi-player games. The starter box comes with everything you need to get going. A 20″ square coated paper gaming mat, eighteen miniatures, eleven dice, over forty cards, ten flat card scenery counters, a custom range ruler, thirty counters/tokens, kill zone marker and threat tracker. The miniatures are all single piece, so the only assembly required is the pointer in the threat tracker. Box to table time is about five minutes!


Once you’re there, what joys await you? There are actually two rulebooks in the set, the main book and the “Read Me First” quick-start rules. These start with a basic version of the game, and over two scenarios add new concepts and rules to bring beginners up to speed: perfect for the comics fan making his first foray into the tabletop world. Your hardened gamer will want to head straight for the main book, however. You will find four clearly defined phases (Action, Event, Melee, End), underpinned by two key concepts: Noise, and Threat. It is well worth taking the time to get your head round these, as they will colour everything you do in the game. 

In a similar way to Zombicide, noise is what drives the walking dead to move around the table and attack the living. There are two levels, NOISE, and MAYHEM. NOISE is caused by running, the “Make NOISE” action, or the “Scream!” action on the panic dice (more on this later), and will attract the nearest walker within 10″. MAYHEM is usually caused by gunfire, and will attract ALL walkers within 10″! There are ways to avoid the noise, by sneaking for example, but in a deviously simple twist of the rules, walkers start with their bases touching the scattered supply counters (your basic objectives), which prevents you from picking them up! Therefore choosing when and where to make noise becomes critical, requiring a balance between getting the supplies before your opponent and not getting swamped by the living dead.


Threat represents the mounting tension and danger as the game progresses, and works as a game mechanic driver and a timer. The threat tracker is numbered from 1 to 18, and divided up into four sections: All Quiet (1-3); Low(4-8);Medium (9-13); and High (14-18). As the game goes on, the threat level will rise quickly (sometimes alarmingly so!), and if it reaches 18, the game ends. In the meantime, if the level goes above one of your Survivor’s “Nerve” score, they panic, and can only be activated via the use of the Panic Dice. This is a six-sider with 5 available results, from a straight run away or quiet action only, to screaming like a schoolboy or going bananas and attacking the nearest walker with the strength of a madman! Threat level can go down as well as up, but this is pretty rare, and only brought about by a concious decision to calm everything down.

Setup is very straight forward and scenario based. There is only one scenario in the main book:-choose survivors, place scenery, place supplies, place walkers, go! Choosing survivors proves to be the only slightly confusing part of the process. Each character card has slots surrounding it to represent the amount of equipment they can carry and where, but the starter set is fairly limited and the only instruction is to play to a points value. The points values only seem to even out in one particular configuration with the cards available, and with only one of each weapon in the box this could seriously limit replay value. However, this is a starter set, so until you have some expansions just try not to get into an argument over who gets what! The number of walkers on the board at the start of the game is based on the points value of the survivor teams, so this can easily scale up or down as required.


The turn sequence feels slightly jarring at first to a seasoned tabletop skirmish player. The Action phase handles survivor movement and shooting, as well as hiding, searching, trading items, or making game specific actions (Make NOISE, Hold Your Nerve, Special Action). but not hand-to-hand combat. The separate Melee phase handles this, and after a couple of turns it becomes obvious that this is a big part of the mechanic that drives the game. Once the survivors have had their turn (two actions each, but must be two different actions), the Event phase determines if you have been unfortunate enough to get too close to the dead. A handy Kill Zone template is placed over each walker in turn, and if a survivor is within the template radius it will lunge into close combat. This phase ends with the drawing of an event card which may have different results depending on the current threat level. Once this has been dealt with, it’s on to Melee. This is probably the most complicated part of the system, but again, after a couple of turns it seems to work itself out. The melee itself is easy, but working out who fights who, whether to attack or defend, and the order of combat is a bit fiddly at first. 

All combat, ranged and close, is handled with the custom dice, with different colours having differing strengths. Character and equipment cards will give you your dice pool, with the same colours being used for attack or defence, with a straight roll-off to determine the winner. The difference in the number of successes gives the amount of damage taken by survivors, but walkers only have one point of damage and are immediately knocked down… only to get back up again in subsequent turns! This can only be stopped by head shots. Some of the dice faces have an exclamation mark on them to denote headshots. One of these lets you take out a walker, as long as you cause damage. Against survivors, they do extra damage, and if you kill a chartacter with one they won’t be re-animating any time soon. Oh yes, if a survivor is killed but not “dealt with”, they will be returning as a fresh walking corpse to attack the living! If a walker scores a headshot the character has been bitten, and the resulting infection speeds him or her to their early (but temporary) grave. 


As mentioned before, all walker movement is reactionary. The rules are fairly simple on this, it all comes down to “eligible” walkers, those not prone or touching a character’s base at the point when they are activated. The dead will only respond to action on the table or cards in the event phase, but this means they can actually move at any time, not just in the action phase. Too much noise in the melee phase therefore can lead to more and more walkers swamping your characters, which can be very bad news when you can only declare one attack per phase (all other combats will be defensive), and walker dice ramp up exponentially for each additional corpse in the fray! 

Most of the other happenings in the game are determined by a throw of the black Action Dice. 3 blank faces and 3 badge icons give you a 50-50 chance (effectively a D2 or coin-flip) on anything you want to do that’s not covered by the rules, plus a few of the basic actions. While it does feel a bit simplistic, there’s no denying it makes decision making easier, and keeps the game moving on at a rapid rate.


Overall, this game wins for me on both fronts. The very basic gameplay keeps it fun, but the rapidly rising threat and brilliantly simple walker mechanic keep the tension high at all times. No character is too powerful, even the important ones. In my first game, Rick Grimes died in turn three, only to re-animate and proceed to chase Carl around the map until the last turn ticked over. Thus ruining The Walking Dead continuity forever… What appears at first to be a simplistic turn sequence is actually quite cleverly designed to create the feel of the Walking Dead comics, with a lingering threat hanging over everything, and a corpse ready to reach out and bite you at any time. The comic art is used throughout, unsurprisingly, with everything from cards to miniatures adding to the theme, and for me the figures are one of the biggest selling points. Single piece, hard styrene, excellent sculpts, with hardly any flash marks or cleaning up required. These are some of the best tabletop miniatures I’ve ever seen in a game, better than (yes, I’m saying it) Imperial Assault, my previous benchmark. The sculpts have been bulked up a little to allow for extra detail, but this just adds to the comic style, and (I’m hoping) their paintablility!


The first expansion set is the scenery booster which basically gives you hard plastic replacements for all of the card scenery and supply counters in the box. I would happily use these in any post apocalypse/modern game settings, and for twenty quid I would recommend that anyone who plays in these settings gets a set. They are an absolute bargain that will enhance any battlefield, with the same crisp lines and hard-shell construction that make the miniatures stand out. 


There are a couple of niggles. The dice do look a bit shabby, not quite cheap-and-nasty, but enough to detract from the overall quality of the game. It could be a deliberate attempt to get that overall world-falling-apart feel, but I doubt it. Disappointing given the overall high standard of the rest of the box, and ends up looking like corner-cutting. Similarly, the paper map is a bit basic. Nice print, but would it kill you to make it double sided for a bit of variety? Ultimately this is a tabletop game, so you can create your own battlefield, and scale it up as large as you like, but for beginners I would want a little more. Maybe you can just pull out that old Mars Attacks! map for a bit of size/visual variation…


This is a core set, and expansions are heading out thick and fast. For fans of The Walking Dead Comics, or even the TV show (spoiler alert: Daryl Dixon does not exist in the comic world…) this is a great bit of kit, well worth a little investment, and for gamers who are not yet quite sick of all the living dead games on the market this has simple and interesting mechanics, and enough replayability to nudge onto your table on a semi-regular basis. But you will want to pick up some expansions to keep it that way, and to collect all your favourite characters. But make sure you save those Mantic points up.

Seriously, Michonne and Abraham only available as collect-and-exchange bonus packs? A bit naughty if you ask me!


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Dave “Not Using The Z-Word Today” Mustill


Despite being a big fan of WizKids’ other collectible franchise in Heroclix, dice games such as Elder Sign, and Deck Building games such as Legendary Encounters, it seems weird to me that I have never given Dice Masters a go. So it is great that WizKids have released a stand-alone version of the game straight out of the box but can also be compatible with previous versions should you wish to have the Turtles take on Marvel and DC as they have done with Heroclix. So, as a 90s kid who used to love the cartoon, this seems like an ideal starter set to introduce me to the system.

The game reminds me of similar deck building games such as Magic or Legendary in the sense that you start off with weak cards that generate energy which you can then use to buy characters and more powerful dice to level up as you play. However, because there are a lot of different abilities – especially with cards working with other cards, as the Turtles should – this allows for a lot more strategy as you use resource management and chaining your abilities to either increase in power or mass a large attack to seriously damage your opponent. Alternatively you can hold dice back to exchange for other powers that can be used to enhance your defence at the detriment of not being used for another attack later on.

It was this resource management that made me feel like there was more strategy and synergy in the combination of characters than in games like Legendary but there was also more chaos due to the randomness of the dice rolls which adds that little bit of luck factor that can force you to adapt your strategy on the fly if you don’t get the result you want. Some people don’t like an element of randomness in their strategy games, but I for one like the idea of things going wrong and forcing you to adapt. I also thought that despite some unlucky rolls, I never really felt truly cheated out of victory if I was unlucky as there was always a feeling that it could be turned around.

Some downsides to the game are that it feels as though it is chiefly a one on one game for two players, like a lot of collectible game engines and the inclusion for the ability to play with up to four players feels tacked on so I would mainly keep this as a two player only game personally, especially as I feel there are better four player dedicated games that can hit the table instead. Also, as the game is typically a collectible style game aside from this stand-alone version, I’m not sure how the characters and dice in this game would work if you combined it with other sets, as I would worry that these would be trounced by super rares and chase variants a la Heroclix, but without playing other versions I wouldn’t be able to confirm this, so my fears may be unfounded.

Despite this, TMNT Dice Masters seems like an ideal set to get you into the system without falling into the money pit that is hunting for gravity feeds, especially if you are a fan of TMNT in general. So check it out if you are fan of Turtles or Deck Building games.

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Blake Harmer is a regular contributor to The Crazy Train and The Gamescast at emotionally14.com. You can follow him on Twitter at @fucksakeblake, but there’s no real point in doing so.


Wings of Glory has long been one of those games that I’ve seen people play at conventions or on social media, but due their – rather unfortunate – inability to keep starter kits in print consistently, it’s taken until now for me to actually play a game.  For this review, I teamed up with Brick Fury‘s Ian Harmer, who as well as being a Heroclix nut is rather fanatical about military planes, too.  As he also had a few games of Star Wars: X-Wing under his belt, I figured that he’d be a good person to try this game out with.

The game comes packaged very nicely, in a sturdy box that not only displays the figures nicely, but the vacuum-formed insert inside actually also works very well in terms of storing your components after you’ve punched a prepped them all!  If only all game boxes could be this accommodating.


The planes themselves are absolutely superb.  The detail is great, and the paintjobs are excellent.  They feel suitably sturdy, and should endure many years of play with ease.  They have a decent weight to them, and are a joy to “fly” around the tabletop.  My only criticism would be that there’s no way to tell planes of the same type apart – some sort of marker or distinguishing feature would help a lot.

The rules are super easy to get to grips with.  We were playing with the basic game after a few minutes, and after just one game of that, we feel ready to tackle the full blown ruleset – hopefully with some extra planes added in, as well.  You also get a huge scenario book, loaded with ideas and missions that’ll keep you occupied for quite a long time.


The game itself is incredibly easy to get your head around.  Players plot their moves secretly, and once everyone has placed their selected move face down, they then have to simulanaeously move their planes around the playing area, trying to out guess their opponent and get into a good firing position.

Comparisons with its much more successful cousin, X-Wing, are inevitable and – for what it’s worth – I think I prefer Wings of Glory. I enjoy both, but Wings of Glory feels much more streamlined, and simultaneous movement and shooting goes a long way towards making the game much smoother.

I’m looking forward to what else the system can offer, but so far, this Starter Set is superb! Ian shared my views, and was browsing extra planes on eBay within minutes!

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Brad Harmer-Barnes is a games journalist and comedy writer from Kent, England, and has written for (among others) Miniature Wargames magazine, Fortress: Ameritrash, Emotionally14.com and Suppressing-Fire.Com, which he also edits. You can follow him on Instagram and Twitter @realbradhb.

Joe, Ian and Brad are back, and this time they’re unboxing, reviewing and discussing the new Guardians of the Galaxy set for Heroclix. 

For the full, uncut play test footage: 


Runewars: The Miniatures Game is Final Fantasy Games’ newest big game system, and it is looking to be huge. Set in the Runebound universe, players fight for dominance on the battlefield, using sword and spear, magic and huge beasts to vanquish each other, and rule the fantasy realm of Terrinoth.

First things first, I know absolutely nothing about the Runebound Universe, and so this review is likely to miss a few marks and infuriate some die-hard fans. Sorry! Feel free to track me down and message me incorrect facts about things I like!

Runewars is an interesting hybrid of a game. Mixing troop-based ground combat with the Flight Path System used in games such as X-Wing, it presents itself as something familiar to fans of existing games, yet different enough to not feel like a simple re-skin. Much like games such as X-Wing and both variants of Attack Wing, this starter set contains enough for two starter forces, one of the noble Daqan Lords (read: generic high-fantasy humans) and the other re-animated forces of Waiqar the Undying (read: skeletons, monster worms and other gooey nasties), and all the miniatures, dice, tokens and assorted gubbins needed to addict you and and a friend to your newest set of plastic crack.


Opening up the hefty box, we are presented with three booklets and some cardboard sprues full of token style things. We immediately fling those to one side, because Holy Tolkien, this thing has some beautiful miniatures! On a quick look, there’s forty-six assorted soldiers and cavalry and things, and two huge monsters. All of them have some exquisite detail, and I am immediately drawn to something called a Rune Golem. It’s a big rock-like man-thing with tasty looking swords and the box art tells me that it has an internal blue glow, and it is very tempting to just stop this review right now and go paint it. No. I won’t. I’ll finish this first. I hope you understand how tough this is for me.

Unlike some other FFG titles, the models in this set come unpainted and need some assembly. 

The tokens are nicely designed, all in cardboard, as are the movement templates and range ruler. The dice are 8-sided, and contain some nice custom symbols.

Back to the three booklets, we have Learn to Play, Rules Reference and Lore Guide. I’m a big fan of this format, as it’s a really good way to get into the game. Learn to Play gives you the basics of the system, how to build a force, how to move, how to fight, and a simple one-on-one skirmish scenario. It introduces some more complex elements, but focuses on getting you to grips with how to play the game. The Rules Reference is a wonderful idea. I’ve seen it in other FFG releases, and it’s the closest thing to an “argument settler” that you’re going to get. What happens is my Rune Golem flanks your Archers? It’s in the book. What if I can’t work out how many dice to roll? That’s in the book too.The Lore Guide is pure chrome, and if the other books introduce you to the game, this introduces you to the world that that game exists in, and the factions at war within it.


I’m not going to dive too in-depth into the rules, that’s what the rulebook is for, but I’ll try to convey the general ideas. 

Each unit in your army has a double dial thingy that sets what that unit will be doing that round. It doesn’t define what direction the unit will be moving in, like X-Wing, but defines what type of action that unit will perform, such as moving, attacking and shooting. The second dial can modify the first, adding attack dice, bolstering defence and the like.

Movement uses movement templates almost exactly like every other game that uses the Flight Path system, to guide the position of your troops. The difference comes when one unit meets another. All the other versions are based in space or aerial combat, and the aim is not to bump into your opponent, but to line up clever shots and angles on them. This is not so in Runewars. You actually want to crash into your opponent, charging into their forces and attacking them head on, or even forcing a flanking attack, catching a unit unawares. This is the largest difference, to me, from Runewars‘ contemporaries, and it adds a small amount of complexity. Troops perform a function called “squaring up” where they literally form lines against each other, and this doesn’t use any kind of movement template, therefor allowing for exact positioning, and a freer range of movement on the battlefield.


As is standard, troops are bought with points, and given upgrades such as special weapons and character traits. This set contains plenty of such upgrades, and it doesn’t take long to spot some great and effective combos.

Again, I’m really breezing over the rules here as I don’t have a tonne of games under my belt, but it also includes effects such as Boons and Banes, which can help or hinder your troops, panic reactions, and varying levels of magic, that can ruin the best laid plans, or pull victory from a seemingly definite defeat.

In summary, Runewars seems to be a very in-depth, rewarding experience. In terms of complexity, it definitely ranks above X-Wing, in a similar area to D&D: Attack Wing or Star Wars: Armada. It’s not, by any means, a difficult game to learn, but keeping track of the various multipliers and game effects at once will take some diligence, and I doubt the rule book will be far from hand for quite a while. If this sounds like a negative, it really isn’t, it’s actually to the strength of the game; you won’t feel like there’s nothing left to master any time soon, and it will keep you coming back to try new tactics time and time again.

Realistically, the price tag may seem a little scary to fans of X-Wing and Star Trek: Attack Wing, but the contents are not comparable. Both space games contain three miniatures. Runewars contains many multi-part, multi-size characters screaming for customisation. Which is what I’m off to do right now.

Can I Fit LEDs in a Rune Golem?/10
Ömer Ibrahim is a regular contributor to Suppressing Fire and you can check out his modelling work on Facebook and Instagram.