Archive for the ‘X-Wing’ Category


If there’s one thing all tabletop games need more of, it’s Wookiees. Can you imagine Mansions of Madness, but on Kashyyyk? Berserkers of Catan anyone? Hell, even Scrabble should make it an acceptable word if you ask me.

Equally as brilliant is the fact that the “Auzituck” Wookiee Gunship has come to X-Wing, and it’s brought a mixed bag of goodies with it. Physically, the Auzituck is a nice, small-based model, brimming with guns and engines. The paintwork is as good as normal, with some really cool tribal designs over the body.

In game terms, the Auzituck has three attack dice and and only one one defence, but with six hull and three shields, it isn’t going to fall apart quickly. This is helped by its choice of actions. As well as being able to Focus, it’s the first non-Epic ship to be able to perform the Reinforce action. When a ship reinforces either the front of back of itself, when attacked from that angle, it can add an extra evade result to its dice roll. Unlike an Evade token though, it doesn’t spend the token, and can re-use it each time it is attacked.

As well as this new function, it also boasts a 180 degree auxiliary firing arc, formerly only seen on the YV-666, making this the first small-based ship to boast such a wide attack arc.


This huge attack range is useful, as the ship has no way of turning in a hurry, the dial is fine, but features no k-turns, or any other type of “flips”. In terms of upgrades, the Gunship has two Crew slots, with three of the four available pilots able to take an Elite Pilot Talent.  As I just mentioned, the Auzituck comes with four pilots, two of them Unique. From the bottom up, “Kashyyyk Defender” is a 24 point, PS1 generic pilot. “Wookiee Liberator” is the PS3, 26 point version, which also comes with an EPT slot.
Lowhhrick is the unique PS5 pilot and his ability is causing a stir: “When another friendly ship at Range 1 is defending, you may spend 1 reinforce token. If you do, the defender adds 1 evade result.”

On it’s own, it’s a handy little trick, but it’s found a home in a frustrating little squadron called “Fair Ship Rebels 2.0” (At least that’s the “proper” name, a lot of players aren’t calling it anything so polite). Consisting of Lowhhrick, Biggs Darklighter, Captain Rex and Jess Pava, the list’s ability to share and negate incoming damage is almost unparalleled, as well as doing things like taking away the opponent’s attack dice. These types of builds come and go, and I always feel that you should just play whatever you want, this included, but I’ve played against this squad twice now, and neither game was a fun time. I can’t imagine that using it is much fun either.

Wullffwarro, on the other hand, is my type of pilot. The PS7 Wookie Gladiator gets an extra attack dice if he has no shields and at least one damage card, making him a dangerous ship to leave half alive. At thirty points, he’ll definitely give you some bang for your buck, even if he goes bang.


In terms of upgrades, this expansion comes with six, three of which are new to this pack. “Selflessness” is part of the previously mentioned FSR puzzle. A 1 point EPT, you may discard the upgrade when a friendly ship at range 1 is defending. If you do, your ship may absorb all of the uncanceled hits. “Wookiee Commandos” is a 1 point crew upgrade that takes two crew slots, and allows you to re-roll any Focus results whilst attacking. “Breech Specialist” costs one point and is another crew upgrade. It’s wording is quite intricate, so I’ll include the entire text: “When you are dealt a faceup Damage card, you may spend 1 reinforce token to flip it facedown (without resolving its effect). If you do, until the end of the round, when you are dealt a faceup Damage card, flip it facedown (without resolving its effect).”

It’s like Chewbacca’s pilot ability, which is nice and thematic. 

So, the Auzituck had found itself in one meta-level squad already, and that actually may hurt it. If it gets seen as “that ship from that squad”, it may not get used as much as its quality probably warrants. That said, I’ve seen two Gunships loaded with Tactitians teamed up with Braylen Stramm in a super-stressbot team that looks quite fun. I’m pretty sure Wullffwarro could make a good “glory in death” squad member, someone just needs to find the right recipe. 
Personally I like the ship, it’s fun to play with, and it looks good on the table.

One forward and focus until I lose the will to live/10

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Ömer Ibrahim is a regular contributor to Suppressing Fire and you can check out his modelling work on Facebook and Instagram.

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Back in December, I – like so many of us – sat in the cinema watching Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, and being absolutely blown away by the way that the universe we all know and love was being presented in a totally different light.  It was dark, grounded, and (for the most part) lacking in The Force and lightsabers.  The climactic scene of the battle of Scarif had me engrossed in a way that a massive space battle hasn’t since The Battle of Endor.  Sure the Battle of Naboo and the Battle of Geonosis looked great, but they didn’t have the emotional hook that Scarif and Endor had.  

Watching the Battle of Scarif filled me with the desire to throw a game of Armada on the table.  


Now, as I’m sure some of you remember, there’s a really great moment in that battle where we see the Hammerhead Corvettes in action for the first time, crashing into a Star Destroyer, pushing it into the side of another Star Destroyer.  Now, here they are, ready to wreak their own brand of havoc on the tabletop.  So, how do they fare?  Do we have melee combat in Armada?

The models are back on form.  While they originally appeared in Star Wars: Rebels, they’ve been given an appearance closer to how they look in Rogue One.  I think this is a good creative decision, as most of the ships (except in instances where they have only appeared in Rebels or The Clone Wars) have a “movie” look to them.  The scale seems fine (with the usually leeway we give to Armada’s scale), and they look good on the tabletop.  So, what else do we get with them?


Well, just for starters there’s the option to have Princess Leia leading your fleet!  We’ve seen her before as a supporting officer, but this is her first appearance as a commander, a role she’s undeniable suited to.  For fans of Rebels and The Clone Wars, there’s also not the option to throw Honda in on the side of the Rebellion.  Hondo’s ability is based around buffing your own orders, and bamboozling the enemy’s chain of command.  A nice thematic ability for the pirate king.

Another of my favourite cards included has to be the boarding engineers.  I love boarding actions in any game, and basically the way these guys work is that if you can get up close to another ship, they leap aboard and let you flip facedown damage to face up.  A simple, yet suitably thematic way of replicating a devastating boarding action on the tabletop, without getting bogged down in minutiae and dice rolls.  

Similarly, the external racks are a wonderful addition.  The Rebellion has gradually acquired some big guns as the game has gone along, but nothing to compare with the Imperial Class Star Destroyer.  The external racks tweak that slightly, allowing you a one-shot additional two black dice attack.  Pretty punchy for a small ship.


Brad, this is all very interesting.  I can hear you cry.  But we wanna do the ramming thing.  Tell us how the ramming thing works.  

Okay, the ramming thing.  Sorry to break it to you, but you can’t just go ramming these boys into the enemy like it’s Thunder Road.  The ramming ability is unique to a ship name (“Garel’s Honour”), and basically it means that when you overlap an enemy ship, they take face up rather than facedown damage.  Yep, that’s it.  

I’m in two minds as to whether I like that or not.  I mean, the attack tactics they used at the Battle of Scarif were built on desperation and a spur of the moment attack.  It wasn’t something that the ships were actually built to the able to do, so why should every Hammerhead in the Star Wars universe decide to do it.  On the other…to get gamey…every player fielding these is going to want to do it.

I guess just go in knowing that’s not what they’re built to do.  For me, this pack is totally worth it just for the Princess Leia and boarding engineer cards.  The Boarding Engineers are just so much fun, and Princess Leia may not be the most powerful commander in the game, but, well, to me, she is royalty.  


To celebrate the release of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, FFG released two new ships for X-Wing: The TIE Striker for the Imperial Faction, and for the Rebellion, the U-Wing. Being a predominantly Rebel player, let’s dive into the U-Wing!

As usual, the first thing I do is look at the physical model, and I’m glad to say that it meets the usual X-Wing standard. Like only a few releases before it, it has moving parts. The wings go from the forward “landing” position to the rear “attack” position in a very satisfying way, physically representing an in-game mechanic, as well as just looking really cool. The detail is as crisp as always, and the paintwork is nice, featuring the standard Rebel “used future” wear and tear. My only quibble is that it is a large-base ship, no longer than the K-Wing on its small base, and so looks a little diminutive on the table, but that’s really more of a game mechanic problem than a modelling one.

I’ve yet to see the ship itself make a massive mark on the game, but there’s plenty of promise in it. The expansion features four pilots, three of them unique, as well as fourteen upgrade cards, nine of them new as of this release. It boasts 3 Attack Dice, 1 Agility, 4 Hull and 4 Shields, and can take both the Focus and Target Lock actions. The dial is fair, with a nice range of motion. It cannot flip and turn around, but it can do a “0” manoeuvre, essentially not going anywhere for a round.
The highest skilled pilot is Cassian Andor, the only U-Wing pilot capable of taking Elite Pilot Talent upgrades, a 27 point, Pilot Skill 6 unique character. His special ability allows him to remove a stress token from any friendly ship, other than himself, at Range 1, at the start of the activation phase, making him a useful support in the current meta of ships handing out stress tokens.

Two other names pilots, Bodhi Rook and Heff Tobber are also included. Bodhi basically frees up the range that your squad can take target locks, by allowing them to use each other to lock on, meaning that you are not limited by only locking on to a ship close to you.

Heff is a blocking pilot, with his low pilot skill, he wants enemy ships to bump into him, and after stopping them taking an action, he gets a free action himself, allowing him to get multiple actions per turn if you put him in the right place. Give him something like Engine Upgrade, and when a ship bumps into him, he can then boost away from them, waiting for the next ship to touch him. That will cause chaos against swarm players.

More of the cast of Rogue One show up in the form of Crew Upgrade cards. I won’t do a detailed break down of each one, but as a quick list:

Jyn Erso can collate multiple Focus tokens if multiple enemies are bearing down on her.

Cassian Andor can take a sneaky look at your opponent’s dial, and change plan accordingly.

Baze Malbus allows you to shoot at another target, if you miss your first.

Bistan lets you turn hits into critical hits.

Bodhi Rook has the same ability as his pilot card, allowing you to target lock all over the place.

Another upgrade of note is “Pivot Wing”, a free dual title card for the U-Wing that represents its mobile S-Foils. In “Landing” mode you can, after performing a 0 “stop” move, rotate the ship 180 degrees, essentially creating the tightest turn in the game. On the other hand, in “Attack” mode, you increase your agility by one, bringing its attack and defence level with something like an X-Wing. After moving, you may flip this card, so planning for the next round is essential. 

And then there’s “Expertise”. Expertise is a 4 point Elite Pilot Talent upgrade, and it has made a huge impact on the game, both in its effectiveness, and in the fact that people are planning whole ships and lists to counter it. It’s beauty is in its simplicity: As long as you are not stressed, when attacking, you may change all of your eyeball results to hits. That’s it, and in the right hands it’s brutal. If you read my review of Heroes of the Resistance you’ll have seen my list for Rey flying the Falcon. That list was getting me to between 10th and 8th in tournaments. I dropped Expertise on Rey, and instantly came 4th. The only lists that beat me were ones specifically built to counter how my list works. And you get two of these cards in the box!

Expertise aside, the U-Wing is a great little expansion, even if not a complete “must have”, even for Rebel players. It doesn’t capture the ship or the characters quite as lovingly as the aforementioned Heroes of the Resistance, but isn’t exactly inaccurate either. If you liked Rogue One, particularly the awesome space battle at the end, you’ll love moving this ship’s wings and doing K-2SO quotes.

Rebellions are built on Expertise/10

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Ömer Ibrahim is a regular contributor to Suppressing Fire and you can check out his modelling work at Can’t Sleep, Must Paint.


When the Scum and Villainy faction was announced for X-Wing, it announced the first time that ships crossed into different factions. The Rebel Y-Wing, Z-95 Headhunter and HWK-290 and the Imperial Firespray-31could now be played in the new faction as well as their original factions. Since then, no ships have crossed over…until now. With the release of Sabine’s TIE Fighter, an Imperial ship is available to the Rebel Alliance. 

Slight spoiler warning for those not up to speed with the Star Wars: Rebels series, some of the cards in here reveal some characters that turn up, so tread carefully from here on in.

The model is, as far as I can tell, the same TIE Fighter that was released way back in the first Core Set and Wave 1, but with Sabine’s cool yellow paint scheme.

Stats-wise it is, again, a standard TIE Fighter, with 2 attack, 3 defence, 3 hull and no shields. It is able to take Focus, Barrel Roll and Evade actions, just like the Imperial version.


Four pilots are included in the expansion, all of them Unique, meaning that the Rebels can field not more than 4 TIE Fighters.

The highest costed pilot is the one-time apprentice of Anakin Skywalker, Ahsoka Tano. Costing 17 points and having a pilot skill of 7, her interesting ability allows her, or a friendly ship at range one, to take an action at the start of the combat phase, at the cost of a Focus Token.

At 15 points, Sabine herself pilots a 15 point fighter with the same pilot skill and ability as her previous release, PS5 and able to take a Boost or Barrel Roll before taking a manoeuvre. 

The clone Captain Rex pops up for 14 points at PS4, and is the first Rebel to use the new “Condition” abilities. Basically speaking, after Captain Rex attacks someone, if that pilot attacks someone that isn’t Rex, they lose one attack dice. As long as Rex keeps attacking, this can stick around, so it could be a tricky card to use, but nasty if you get the hang of it.


Lastly, “Zeb” Orrelios has the cheapest TIE at 13 points, at PS3 and using the same ability to cancel Critical Hits before Hits as he had in the Ghost expansion. 

Five upgrades are included, four of them new, and each of those are Unique.


“Sabine’s Masterpiece” is a Rebel only title card that allows the ship to take Illicit and Crew upgrades, vastly changing how TIE Fighters behave.

Captain Rex also appears as a Crew card, and with him equipped, if you miss your target you can assign yourself a Focus Token.

“Captured TIE” is another Rebel only card, a Modification that means that until you make an attack, pilots with a lower skill than you cannot target you.

Finally, EMP Device is an Illicit Upgrade that can be used to support the Captured TIE Mod. Instead of performing an attack, you can instead choose to discard the card to deal 2 Ion Tokens to every ship at Range 1. This isn’t an attack, so enemy ships still can’t target you, but you’re going to receive Ion Tokens too, being at Range 1 of yourself.

Cynics may see this as a cheap re-paint of an already released expansion, but I think there’s enough in here to have some real fun with. It’s too soon to see if it’ll have any great effect on the game as a whole, but I expect to see a lot of this ship playing support to bigger ships. I myself cannot wait to fly this with my Ghost and Phantom.

Grand Theft Autoblaster/10

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Ömer Ibrahim is a regular contributor to Suppressing Fire and you can check out his modelling work at Can’t Sleep, Must Paint.

The latest release for the Star Wars X-Wing Miniatures Game comes in the form of the Heroes of the Resistance expansion pack. Focused on re-releasing both the T-70 X-Wing and the YT-1300 (better known as the Millennium Falcon) as they are represented in Star Wars: The Force Awakens, is this pack a cynical cash grab, or something useful for the game that players both want and will use?

 

Physically, the pack comprises of two models, twenty-eight cards, and all the stands, tokens, dials and assorted gubbins that you will need to add these to your game. 

The models are of previously released ships, but they differ in some substantial ways. The T-70 X-Wing is completely repainted to represent Poe Dameron’s “Black One” fighter, as well as having a re-modelled astromech droid that supposedly looks more like BB-8. Whilst the paintwork is really great (even if droves of people had done their own re-paints, making us all feel a bit redundant) I’m not sure that that little plastic lump does look any more like BB-8. The Millennium Falcon, on the other hand, is a masterpiece. More than just a re-release of the earlier model with a new satellite dish, this has been completely re-sculpted, using 3D references straight from Lucasfilm, rather than just screen grabs from the movie and creative licence. This probably makes this model the most accurate in the entirety of X-Wing. It’s also the first model to feature engine glow as standard, and whilst it’s not perfect, it’s a lovely touch.

So, they look like much… but do they have it where it counts, kid?
In short, yes. Of the twenty-eight cards included in the pack, twenty-four of them are new and exclusive to this release, and some of them are priceless. I won’t break down every single card here, but I’ll offer up some highlights: 


Poe Dameron

A new version of an already released pilot, this card bumps Poe in his T-70 X-Wing up from Pilot Skill 8 to 9 (where he should always have been) at a cost of two additional points. Everything else, including his powerful pilot ability are the same, he just seems a bit better now. At 33 points, he isn’t cheap, 4 points more than his contemporary, Wedge Antilles, but he seems to be well worth it.


Nien Nunb

Formerly a Crew upgrade card, now a fully-fledged T-70 pilot, the PS7 Sullustan is an expert at flipping himself around the battlefield without receiving stress, with his pilot ability: “When you receive a stress token, if there is an enemy ship inside your firing arc at Range 1, you may discard that stress token.” Initially not the most powerful skill, people have been using him for all sorts of shenanigans since the pack was released.

Han Solo

Returning to fly his beloved YT-1300, the new Han pilot card represents his ability to slip past Starkiller Base’s defence shields. Costing the same points and having the same pilot skill as the original version, his new ability basically allows him to start the game almost anywhere on the battlefield, making him a dangerous wildcard if played correctly.


Chewbacca

Much like Han Solo, Chewie is back with the same pilot skill and point cost as before, but with a new ability that, again, represents his role in The Force Awakens, though this time with heart breaking accuracy: “When another friendly ship at Range 1-3 is destroyed (but has not fled the battlefield), you may perform an attack.” Oh, god, Uncle Chewie! Who equipped the “Crying like a child” upgrade card into my eyes!

Rey

The undisputed MVP of this expansion is Rey, flying the Falcon. If the PS 8 heroine has someone in her front arc, she can re-roll up to two blank results, when either attacking or defending. This combo’s up beautifully with:
Finn (Crew).


If you equip Finn in one of the Falcon’s two crew slots, he adds one blank result to the roll, if you are attacking, or defending from, an opponent within your firing arc. Pair this with Rey’s ability to re-roll those blanks, and you’ve got a hart-hitting beast of a ship that still manages to accurately portray the action from the movie.

Honourable Mentions:

Rey (Crew): She basically lets you save up Focus tokens and get them back later. Really useful crew that I keep coming back to. Feels like cheating.


Millennium Falcon (Title): New title allows you to basically use a “sloop” manoeuvre; recreating Rey’s flying in TFA, and making the Rey/Finn combo even more lethal.

Smuggling Compartment: For use on both the YT-1300 and the YT-2400 (my favourite ship), this upgrade allows you to utilise an Illicit upgrade, formerly exclusive to the Scum and Villainy faction.
So, is Heroes of the Resistance worth getting? Absolutely. The models are wonderful, the variety of upgrades and opportunities is almost in-exhaustive, and the fun to be had with the contents is boundless. Although this pack has given a very well needed boost to those, like me, playing with the Rebel/Resistance faction, there’s plenty of stuff in here to be utilised by every faction, unlike releases like the “Imperial Veterans”. 

My absolute favourite thing about this set is the love that has gone into it. Whilst it would be very easy to just make powerful cards that constantly win games, each character in this pack seems to represent the character that is portrayed on screen in The Force Awakens, and for me, playing “in universe” is very important. It’s why we all make laser noises when we play.

It’s True, All of It/10

As a bonus, here’s a 100 point squad I’ve been using, comprising mostly of the contents of this pack. It’s really fun, and it hits HARD.


Ömer Ibrahim is a regular contributor to Suppressing Fire and you can check out his modelling work at Can’t Sleep, Must Paint.