Archive for the ‘Aerial’ Category


Wings of Glory has long been one of those games that I’ve seen people play at conventions or on social media, but due their – rather unfortunate – inability to keep starter kits in print consistently, it’s taken until now for me to actually play a game.  For this review, I teamed up with Brick Fury‘s Ian Harmer, who as well as being a Heroclix nut is rather fanatical about military planes, too.  As he also had a few games of Star Wars: X-Wing under his belt, I figured that he’d be a good person to try this game out with.

The game comes packaged very nicely, in a sturdy box that not only displays the figures nicely, but the vacuum-formed insert inside actually also works very well in terms of storing your components after you’ve punched a prepped them all!  If only all game boxes could be this accommodating.


The planes themselves are absolutely superb.  The detail is great, and the paintjobs are excellent.  They feel suitably sturdy, and should endure many years of play with ease.  They have a decent weight to them, and are a joy to “fly” around the tabletop.  My only criticism would be that there’s no way to tell planes of the same type apart – some sort of marker or distinguishing feature would help a lot.

The rules are super easy to get to grips with.  We were playing with the basic game after a few minutes, and after just one game of that, we feel ready to tackle the full blown ruleset – hopefully with some extra planes added in, as well.  You also get a huge scenario book, loaded with ideas and missions that’ll keep you occupied for quite a long time.


The game itself is incredibly easy to get your head around.  Players plot their moves secretly, and once everyone has placed their selected move face down, they then have to simulanaeously move their planes around the playing area, trying to out guess their opponent and get into a good firing position.

Comparisons with its much more successful cousin, X-Wing, are inevitable and – for what it’s worth – I think I prefer Wings of Glory. I enjoy both, but Wings of Glory feels much more streamlined, and simultaneous movement and shooting goes a long way towards making the game much smoother.

I’m looking forward to what else the system can offer, but so far, this Starter Set is superb! Ian shared my views, and was browsing extra planes on eBay within minutes!

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Brad Harmer-Barnes is a games journalist and comedy writer from Kent, England, and has written for (among others) Miniature Wargames magazine, Fortress: Ameritrash, Emotionally14.com and Suppressing-Fire.Com, which he also edits. You can follow him on Instagram and Twitter @realbradhb.

Half support vessel, half big guns, Phoenix Home has arrived in Star Wars: Armada. Another vessel first featured in Star Wars: Rebels, the Phoenix Home can be played one of two ways, both of which are equally valid, depending on your battle plans, and your personal playing style. 


The miniature itself isn’t too bad, but doesn’t look quite dirty enough for the “lived in” feel of the Star Wars universe. In Star Wars things are grubby, or worn, rather than hoovered and shiny like Star Trek. Perhaps it’s a symptom of being based on a cartoon ship, but Phoenix Home looks a little too much like a child’s toy, and not enough like a wargaming miniature…


…yes, I know that, but this just looks a little too much on the toy end of things. 

The two base load outs for the Pelta-class ship (that’s what the Phoenix Home is) are surprisingly diverse. For the main part ships in Star Wars: Armada either come as “the ship you want to use” or “the slightly shitter version of the ship you want to use, but, hey, it’s ten points cheaper”. Here, however, with only a four point difference, what you actually get are different styles of ship. The Assault Ship load out is…well, not exact an über heavy hitter, but it packs a reasonable amount of punch. 

The Command Ship load out, by contrast, forgoes firepower in favour of an increased Squadron statistic. So, with this in the thick of it, a good chunk of your Squadrons will become much more powerful. I love that Star Wars: Armada is focusing more on injecting some theme and narrative into a tabletop war game. It’s what the game was lacking at the start, and it’s much better for its inclusion. 

And, of course, there’s all the juicy upgrades that are so fun to tinker with. Fans of Rebels and The Clone Wars will be pleased to see Ahsoka Tano make her Armada debut. Her ability – to essentially switch one Command Token for another – isn’t particularly impressive, but at two points, it’s fun to add her to your force. “Shields to Maximum!” is a useful ploy to give your ships some shields back. The main drive, though, is on Fighter combat, with “All fighters, follow me!”, “Rapid Launch Bays” and “Fighter Coordination Team” offering some serious buffs to Squadrons. 

This is a great support vehicle for Rebel players, but looking forward, the buffs that it offers to narrative play and squadron heavy players is a welcome progression. Recommended. 

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Brad Harmer-Barnes is a games journalist and comedy writer from Kent, England, and has written for (among others) Miniature Wargames magazine, Fortress: Ameritrash, Emotionally14.com and Suppressing-Fire.Com, which he also edits. You can follow him on Instagram and Twitter @realbradhb


When comes to Star Wars: Armada, the massive dreadnoughts may be both the eye candy and the focus of play, but – much like the battles in the movies themselves, it’s the smaller, single-man fighters that can make the difference between victory and defeat. We’ve had all the usual suspects released in previous waves, so are these two new packs capable of offering something more, or is it time to get the barrel scrapers out?

The Rebel Fighter pack is led by the star of Star Wars: Rebels…the Ghost. Hera is the named pilot you get included, and she packs some pretty heavy guns, as well as a couple of extremely versatile abilities. Firstly, she has Rogue which allows the Ghost to move and attack during the squadron phase; but the Grit ability also allows the Ghost to move if it’s only engaged by a single squadron. The Ghost is built for big, heroic plays, which is exactly what you want to be ding with it. The cheaper version – the VCX-100 Freighter lacks the decent firepower of the Ghost, but it does have some nice…if more strategic and less combative abilities. 


Another vessel featured in Star Wars: Rebels is Ketsu Onyo in the Shadow Caster. Lacking the firepower of the Ghost, but featuring a few extra abilities, including the aforementioned Grit and Rogue, as well a being a Bomber. The cheaper version – the Lancer-Class Pursuit Craft is nice enough, but is just a Tesco Value Shadow Caster

The last ships included are the Z-95 Headhunters. Some people love Z-95s, but to me they’re just a cheaper, shoddier version of the X-Wing, and their debut in Star Wars: Armada has done little to change that opinion. At 7 points a squadron, you could use them to burn up some leftover points during squad building, but that’s about it. The only point of interest is that they possess the Swarm ability, which was previously only used by TIE Fighters and their ilk. How useful this ability will be to you depends on your playing style, but it could come in handy. 


The Imperial set similarly brings three new types of vehicle to Star Wars: Armada. The TIE Phantom originally appeared in the video game Star Wars: Rebel Assault II (nope, me neither) but has since develed a following among players of Fantasy Flight’s Star Wars: X-Wing. These possess the Cloak ability, which allows them to get in a bonus move at the end of the squadron phase, even if engaged. They also carry a decent amount of firepower; both anti-ship and anti-squadron. 

Another X-Wing favourite, the Lambda shuttle, is also now available. While far from a combative vessel, its use as an ECM plane role – which never really works in the scale X-Wing operates at, is considerably better handled here, allowing orders from ships to squadrons to be sent further and more efficiently than previously. 

Last but not least, and another X-Wing bad boy, the VT-49 Decimator has arrived, and it brings a serious shotgun blast of close range damage to the table. With the a heavy weapons at its disposal and the Rogue ability, this has the potential to be a serious Squadron destroyer – especially if they’re full of cheap and nasty Z-95s. 

While both of these sets are not as strong as the squadron releases we’ve seen in previous waves, they’re still definitely worth picking up. The Ghost and the Decimator are great fighters for more aggressive players, and the others definitely add flavour, if nothing else. Armada just keeps getting better and better. 

The Rebel Flighter Squardons II and Imperial Fighter Squadrons II packs are available now. A base set of Star Wars: Armada is required to use the contents. 

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Brad Harmer-Barnes is a games journalist and comedy writer from Kent, England, and has written for (among others) Miniature Wargames magazine, Fortress: Ameritrash, Emotionally14.com and Suppressing-Fire.Com, which he also edits. You can follow him on Instagram and Twitter @realbradhb


To celebrate the release of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, FFG released two new ships for X-Wing: The TIE Striker for the Imperial Faction, and for the Rebellion, the U-Wing. Being a predominantly Rebel player, let’s dive into the U-Wing!

As usual, the first thing I do is look at the physical model, and I’m glad to say that it meets the usual X-Wing standard. Like only a few releases before it, it has moving parts. The wings go from the forward “landing” position to the rear “attack” position in a very satisfying way, physically representing an in-game mechanic, as well as just looking really cool. The detail is as crisp as always, and the paintwork is nice, featuring the standard Rebel “used future” wear and tear. My only quibble is that it is a large-base ship, no longer than the K-Wing on its small base, and so looks a little diminutive on the table, but that’s really more of a game mechanic problem than a modelling one.

I’ve yet to see the ship itself make a massive mark on the game, but there’s plenty of promise in it. The expansion features four pilots, three of them unique, as well as fourteen upgrade cards, nine of them new as of this release. It boasts 3 Attack Dice, 1 Agility, 4 Hull and 4 Shields, and can take both the Focus and Target Lock actions. The dial is fair, with a nice range of motion. It cannot flip and turn around, but it can do a “0” manoeuvre, essentially not going anywhere for a round.
The highest skilled pilot is Cassian Andor, the only U-Wing pilot capable of taking Elite Pilot Talent upgrades, a 27 point, Pilot Skill 6 unique character. His special ability allows him to remove a stress token from any friendly ship, other than himself, at Range 1, at the start of the activation phase, making him a useful support in the current meta of ships handing out stress tokens.

Two other names pilots, Bodhi Rook and Heff Tobber are also included. Bodhi basically frees up the range that your squad can take target locks, by allowing them to use each other to lock on, meaning that you are not limited by only locking on to a ship close to you.

Heff is a blocking pilot, with his low pilot skill, he wants enemy ships to bump into him, and after stopping them taking an action, he gets a free action himself, allowing him to get multiple actions per turn if you put him in the right place. Give him something like Engine Upgrade, and when a ship bumps into him, he can then boost away from them, waiting for the next ship to touch him. That will cause chaos against swarm players.

More of the cast of Rogue One show up in the form of Crew Upgrade cards. I won’t do a detailed break down of each one, but as a quick list:

Jyn Erso can collate multiple Focus tokens if multiple enemies are bearing down on her.

Cassian Andor can take a sneaky look at your opponent’s dial, and change plan accordingly.

Baze Malbus allows you to shoot at another target, if you miss your first.

Bistan lets you turn hits into critical hits.

Bodhi Rook has the same ability as his pilot card, allowing you to target lock all over the place.

Another upgrade of note is “Pivot Wing”, a free dual title card for the U-Wing that represents its mobile S-Foils. In “Landing” mode you can, after performing a 0 “stop” move, rotate the ship 180 degrees, essentially creating the tightest turn in the game. On the other hand, in “Attack” mode, you increase your agility by one, bringing its attack and defence level with something like an X-Wing. After moving, you may flip this card, so planning for the next round is essential. 

And then there’s “Expertise”. Expertise is a 4 point Elite Pilot Talent upgrade, and it has made a huge impact on the game, both in its effectiveness, and in the fact that people are planning whole ships and lists to counter it. It’s beauty is in its simplicity: As long as you are not stressed, when attacking, you may change all of your eyeball results to hits. That’s it, and in the right hands it’s brutal. If you read my review of Heroes of the Resistance you’ll have seen my list for Rey flying the Falcon. That list was getting me to between 10th and 8th in tournaments. I dropped Expertise on Rey, and instantly came 4th. The only lists that beat me were ones specifically built to counter how my list works. And you get two of these cards in the box!

Expertise aside, the U-Wing is a great little expansion, even if not a complete “must have”, even for Rebel players. It doesn’t capture the ship or the characters quite as lovingly as the aforementioned Heroes of the Resistance, but isn’t exactly inaccurate either. If you liked Rogue One, particularly the awesome space battle at the end, you’ll love moving this ship’s wings and doing K-2SO quotes.

Rebellions are built on Expertise/10

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Ömer Ibrahim is a regular contributor to Suppressing Fire and you can check out his modelling work at Can’t Sleep, Must Paint.


When the Scum and Villainy faction was announced for X-Wing, it announced the first time that ships crossed into different factions. The Rebel Y-Wing, Z-95 Headhunter and HWK-290 and the Imperial Firespray-31could now be played in the new faction as well as their original factions. Since then, no ships have crossed over…until now. With the release of Sabine’s TIE Fighter, an Imperial ship is available to the Rebel Alliance. 

Slight spoiler warning for those not up to speed with the Star Wars: Rebels series, some of the cards in here reveal some characters that turn up, so tread carefully from here on in.

The model is, as far as I can tell, the same TIE Fighter that was released way back in the first Core Set and Wave 1, but with Sabine’s cool yellow paint scheme.

Stats-wise it is, again, a standard TIE Fighter, with 2 attack, 3 defence, 3 hull and no shields. It is able to take Focus, Barrel Roll and Evade actions, just like the Imperial version.


Four pilots are included in the expansion, all of them Unique, meaning that the Rebels can field not more than 4 TIE Fighters.

The highest costed pilot is the one-time apprentice of Anakin Skywalker, Ahsoka Tano. Costing 17 points and having a pilot skill of 7, her interesting ability allows her, or a friendly ship at range one, to take an action at the start of the combat phase, at the cost of a Focus Token.

At 15 points, Sabine herself pilots a 15 point fighter with the same pilot skill and ability as her previous release, PS5 and able to take a Boost or Barrel Roll before taking a manoeuvre. 

The clone Captain Rex pops up for 14 points at PS4, and is the first Rebel to use the new “Condition” abilities. Basically speaking, after Captain Rex attacks someone, if that pilot attacks someone that isn’t Rex, they lose one attack dice. As long as Rex keeps attacking, this can stick around, so it could be a tricky card to use, but nasty if you get the hang of it.


Lastly, “Zeb” Orrelios has the cheapest TIE at 13 points, at PS3 and using the same ability to cancel Critical Hits before Hits as he had in the Ghost expansion. 

Five upgrades are included, four of them new, and each of those are Unique.


“Sabine’s Masterpiece” is a Rebel only title card that allows the ship to take Illicit and Crew upgrades, vastly changing how TIE Fighters behave.

Captain Rex also appears as a Crew card, and with him equipped, if you miss your target you can assign yourself a Focus Token.

“Captured TIE” is another Rebel only card, a Modification that means that until you make an attack, pilots with a lower skill than you cannot target you.

Finally, EMP Device is an Illicit Upgrade that can be used to support the Captured TIE Mod. Instead of performing an attack, you can instead choose to discard the card to deal 2 Ion Tokens to every ship at Range 1. This isn’t an attack, so enemy ships still can’t target you, but you’re going to receive Ion Tokens too, being at Range 1 of yourself.

Cynics may see this as a cheap re-paint of an already released expansion, but I think there’s enough in here to have some real fun with. It’s too soon to see if it’ll have any great effect on the game as a whole, but I expect to see a lot of this ship playing support to bigger ships. I myself cannot wait to fly this with my Ghost and Phantom.

Grand Theft Autoblaster/10

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Ömer Ibrahim is a regular contributor to Suppressing Fire and you can check out his modelling work at Can’t Sleep, Must Paint.

The latest release for the Star Wars X-Wing Miniatures Game comes in the form of the Heroes of the Resistance expansion pack. Focused on re-releasing both the T-70 X-Wing and the YT-1300 (better known as the Millennium Falcon) as they are represented in Star Wars: The Force Awakens, is this pack a cynical cash grab, or something useful for the game that players both want and will use?

 

Physically, the pack comprises of two models, twenty-eight cards, and all the stands, tokens, dials and assorted gubbins that you will need to add these to your game. 

The models are of previously released ships, but they differ in some substantial ways. The T-70 X-Wing is completely repainted to represent Poe Dameron’s “Black One” fighter, as well as having a re-modelled astromech droid that supposedly looks more like BB-8. Whilst the paintwork is really great (even if droves of people had done their own re-paints, making us all feel a bit redundant) I’m not sure that that little plastic lump does look any more like BB-8. The Millennium Falcon, on the other hand, is a masterpiece. More than just a re-release of the earlier model with a new satellite dish, this has been completely re-sculpted, using 3D references straight from Lucasfilm, rather than just screen grabs from the movie and creative licence. This probably makes this model the most accurate in the entirety of X-Wing. It’s also the first model to feature engine glow as standard, and whilst it’s not perfect, it’s a lovely touch.

So, they look like much… but do they have it where it counts, kid?
In short, yes. Of the twenty-eight cards included in the pack, twenty-four of them are new and exclusive to this release, and some of them are priceless. I won’t break down every single card here, but I’ll offer up some highlights: 


Poe Dameron

A new version of an already released pilot, this card bumps Poe in his T-70 X-Wing up from Pilot Skill 8 to 9 (where he should always have been) at a cost of two additional points. Everything else, including his powerful pilot ability are the same, he just seems a bit better now. At 33 points, he isn’t cheap, 4 points more than his contemporary, Wedge Antilles, but he seems to be well worth it.


Nien Nunb

Formerly a Crew upgrade card, now a fully-fledged T-70 pilot, the PS7 Sullustan is an expert at flipping himself around the battlefield without receiving stress, with his pilot ability: “When you receive a stress token, if there is an enemy ship inside your firing arc at Range 1, you may discard that stress token.” Initially not the most powerful skill, people have been using him for all sorts of shenanigans since the pack was released.

Han Solo

Returning to fly his beloved YT-1300, the new Han pilot card represents his ability to slip past Starkiller Base’s defence shields. Costing the same points and having the same pilot skill as the original version, his new ability basically allows him to start the game almost anywhere on the battlefield, making him a dangerous wildcard if played correctly.


Chewbacca

Much like Han Solo, Chewie is back with the same pilot skill and point cost as before, but with a new ability that, again, represents his role in The Force Awakens, though this time with heart breaking accuracy: “When another friendly ship at Range 1-3 is destroyed (but has not fled the battlefield), you may perform an attack.” Oh, god, Uncle Chewie! Who equipped the “Crying like a child” upgrade card into my eyes!

Rey

The undisputed MVP of this expansion is Rey, flying the Falcon. If the PS 8 heroine has someone in her front arc, she can re-roll up to two blank results, when either attacking or defending. This combo’s up beautifully with:
Finn (Crew).


If you equip Finn in one of the Falcon’s two crew slots, he adds one blank result to the roll, if you are attacking, or defending from, an opponent within your firing arc. Pair this with Rey’s ability to re-roll those blanks, and you’ve got a hart-hitting beast of a ship that still manages to accurately portray the action from the movie.

Honourable Mentions:

Rey (Crew): She basically lets you save up Focus tokens and get them back later. Really useful crew that I keep coming back to. Feels like cheating.


Millennium Falcon (Title): New title allows you to basically use a “sloop” manoeuvre; recreating Rey’s flying in TFA, and making the Rey/Finn combo even more lethal.

Smuggling Compartment: For use on both the YT-1300 and the YT-2400 (my favourite ship), this upgrade allows you to utilise an Illicit upgrade, formerly exclusive to the Scum and Villainy faction.
So, is Heroes of the Resistance worth getting? Absolutely. The models are wonderful, the variety of upgrades and opportunities is almost in-exhaustive, and the fun to be had with the contents is boundless. Although this pack has given a very well needed boost to those, like me, playing with the Rebel/Resistance faction, there’s plenty of stuff in here to be utilised by every faction, unlike releases like the “Imperial Veterans”. 

My absolute favourite thing about this set is the love that has gone into it. Whilst it would be very easy to just make powerful cards that constantly win games, each character in this pack seems to represent the character that is portrayed on screen in The Force Awakens, and for me, playing “in universe” is very important. It’s why we all make laser noises when we play.

It’s True, All of It/10

As a bonus, here’s a 100 point squad I’ve been using, comprising mostly of the contents of this pack. It’s really fun, and it hits HARD.


Ömer Ibrahim is a regular contributor to Suppressing Fire and you can check out his modelling work at Can’t Sleep, Must Paint.

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X-Wing‘s Wave 9 reinforced Imperial and First Order players with the Special Forces TIE Fighter or “TIE S/F”. The TIE S/F is featured at the beginning of Star Wars – Episode VII: The Force Awakens as the ship in which Poe Dameron and Finn escape Kylo Ren’s Star Destroyer. It’s an advanced version of the First Order TIE fighter, featuring the same distinctive white wings, but with the addition of a rear-facing gunner, controlling an underside gun and missile turret.

Physically, the TIE S/F is pretty standard fare. It’s a TIE fighter with slightly chunkier wing supports and a little turret underneath. The paint work is as good as ever, black with the striking First Order white panels, but also a red stripe to the side of the cockpit, designating its higher rank.

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Like the ARC-170 for the Rebels, this is the first small based ship for the Imperials that has an auxiliary firing arc, meaning that it can also shoot at anything that gets up behind it, exactly as Finn does in The Force Awakens (Oddly though, despite the movie clearly featuring a gunner’s seat, the in-game version doesn’t feature a Crew upgrade slot. Maybe the one in the film was a prototype… that was sitting in the hangar bay… ready to fly… fine, the game probably did it this way for balance reasons.) Its movement dial is a little slower than the TIE F/O, featuring fever green manoeuvres, and with its fastest speed being 4. It’s not a slow ship – even Poe was surprised at its speed – but it’s not the fastest thing in the First Order.

Its base stats feature 2 Attack, 2 Defense, 3 Hull and 3 Shields, making it slightly more likely to get hit than a TIE F/O, but with the extra hit points to withstand those hits. In terms of actions, it can Focus, Target Lock or Barrel Roll, but isn’t deemed fast enough to have the Evade action. It definitely seems like a much more rugged TIE Fighter, built to withstand hits and deal out damage. In fact, it can take as many bangs as a T-70 X-Wing, which is far from a frail ship. It’s also he first ship in the game to be capable of taking Tech and System upgrades, which is creating some nice combos.

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Four new pilot cards are included, two of them are generic pilots and two are named unique pilots.

The unique pilot is “Quickdraw”, a PS 9, 29 point ace with the ability to make an attack when he loses a shield, as well as when he can normally attack. Coupled with the fact that he can shoot backwards, this actually makes other players think before trying to shoot him: If you don’t kill him, chances are he’s going to shoot you twice this round.

The other named pilot is “Backdraft” on a PS 7 at 27 points. If he manages to shoot you from his rear arc, he can add one Critical Hit result to his roll. That’s not a dice modification, he gets an additional hit on top of what he rolls, meaning that if you’re right up his backside at Range 1, which is usually a nice safe place to be, he can deal you a potential 4 damage, with one of those definitely being critical. Sure, it’s hard to get your opponent into that position, but it’s going to stop them trying for it.

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In terms of upgrade cards, there’s a few new ones, with one being specific to the TIE S/F. “Special Ops Training” is a 0 point Title card that allows you to add an additional dice when firing from your front arc, or, if you chose not to add this dice, make an additional attack from your rear arc. Stick that on “Quickdraw” and you’re getting a potential four attacks per round, on up to four targets.

“Collision Detector” allows you to use your barrel roll or boost through an obstacle, and makes the obstacles less damaging to you, and “Sensor Cluster” allows you to spend a focus token to turn one blank result to an evade when defending. (I’m actually thinking of using that card on Poe Dameron. With Autothrusters and a focus token, he’s going to be almost impossible to get more than one damage on per round.)

All in all, the TIE S/F isn’t blowing anyone away. Imperial players rely on large numbers of ships on the board, and this one costs roughly the same as an X-Wing, and though it can be said that it easily flies as well as one, that’s not normally the prerogative of someone flying TIE fighters. That said, there’s enough stuff in this release to add to the game as a whole, and very skilled players are going to be able to use this ship to devastating effect. If you can get this thing stuck in the middle of an enemy formation, it’s going to make a big dent, even if it dies in the process.

This thing really moves/10

Ömer Ibrahim is a regular contributor to Suppressing Fire and you can check out his modelling work at Can’t Sleep, Must Paint.


When FFG release a new wave of ships for the X-Wing Miniatures Game, they often get known for what new things they bring to the game as a whole. I’m pretty sure that Wave 9 will be known as “The Era of the Firing Arc”, with two ships being the first small ships to have a rear firing arc, one aiming to actually be in your opponent’s firing arc, and one that features an all-new “mobile firing arc”.

The first ship I’ll be focusing on is the ARC-170 Starfighter, for the Rebel Alliance faction.

The ARC-170 is a movie-canon ship, it can be seen accompanying Anakin Skywalker and Obi-Wan Kenobi in The Battle of Coruscant at the beginning of Revenge of the Sith. As such, this marks the first real Clone Wars-Era ship to be released for X-Wing. (Yes, I know you can see the Falcon for a few seconds in Attack of the Clones, and that versions of Z-95 Headhunters and Y-Wings turn up in The Clone Wars series, but the versions of those in X-Wing are of the later, Galactic Civil War Versions. Stop nit-picking, I can’t hear you, this is a written article, I’m technically in the past, so now you’re just talking to your screen for no reason, you weirdo.) Originally used by the Clone Troopers that would transform into the Galactic Empire’s Stormtroopers, these ships have been “adapted” and pressed into service by the Rebellion. Whether or not this opens up the door for future Clone Wars releases like the Jedi Interceptors or even whole new factions like the Trade Federation is up for debate, but for now, it’s nice to look backwards at some older technology, instead of focusing on all he souped-up ships of The Force Awakens.


Physically, the model is beautiful; possibly even my favourite release to date. It’s pretty big, for a small-based ship, just narrower than the K-Wing, and about the same length. True to its age, the paintwork makes it look completely battered, with mismatched panels on the wings, scratch marks on the entire body and the Rebel Firebird hastily slapped on one side. The S-Foils are very reminiscent of the classic X-Wing, modelled fully open so that you can actually see straight through the ship. The general level of detail is wonderful, making it perfect for custom paint jobs and modifications.

So, that’s how it looks, but how does a ship older than the already outdated Y-Wing fly?

Really, really well.


The basic ship has a fair dial, a little more manoeuvrable than a Y-Wing, but not as fast or flashy as an X-Wing. Its basic stat line of 2 Attack and 1 Defence aren’t spectacular, but they get the job done, and are built to be modified, and it’s 6 Hull and 3 Shields should help it soak up the damage that it can’t evade. It also features a rear firing arc, meaning it can shoot anything that decides to chase it, albeit only with it’s primary weapon. 

Interestingly, it has no generic pilots, meaning that whatever size of game you are playing, you can never run more than four of the ship. Whilst some may not like the idea of not having a cheap, generic version to use, I think that it keeps with the theme of the ship. There aren’t many of these relics left flying, and only a few people know how to use them. The Squad Point cost of these pilots are 25, 26, 28 and 29, putting it in at the mid-to-top level of fighter costs. In terms of upgrades, these are the first ship to be able to take both an Astromech Droid and a Crew Member, opening up some wicked combos, and allowing C-3PO and R2-D2 to fly together for only the second time in the game. Which is nice.

The four named pilots vary in quality, but there are two that are making the most noise in the community.


Shara Bey is Poe Dameron’s mother. Poe Dameron flies possibly the most advanced Starfighter in the galaxy, the T-70 X-Wing, but his mum pilots a chugging old mini-van of an ARC-170. If there were a Poe crew card in the game, the teen comedy would write itself. Miss Bey’s pilot ability basically lets friendly ships use her target lock as their own, freeing up the actions of other pilots and making her a tasty support piece. Dameron’s mum has got it going on.

The other well-received pilot is Norra Wexley (Snap Wexley’s mum, from Aftermath – Ed). If she has a target lock on an enemy ship, she can spend it to add one focus result to her roll. Whilst this may not sound too fantastic, it pairs up quite nicely with some of the upgrades available through this pack.


The main upgrade that will probably be given to every ARC-170 is “Alliance Overhaul”, a title card fit for only the ARC-170. Costing zero points, it allows any attacks from the front firing arc to roll an additional dice, and any attacks from the rear may change one focus result to a critical hit. Miss Wexley’s ability to generate focuses is suddenly more useful.

Other upgrades of note are “Tail Gunner”, which reduces the agility of the target when firing from the rear arc, “Vectored Thrusters”, which allows any small ship to take a barrel roll action, and the “R3 Astromech”, which enables you to cancel one focus result whilst attacking to give your ship an evade token. Again, very useful with Norra.


Another fun upgrade is the “Seismic Torpedo” which allows you do destroy and remove obstacles from the game, whilst possibly hurting anyone close to it. Changing the layout of the table is a big step for the game, and is sure to change the way people play.

All in all, the ARC-170 is a very strong release, and a wonderful addition to the sometimes under-appreciated Rebel faction. It adds lots of new aspects to the game, without overpowering anything that had come before, and that can only be a good thing.

Score: I’m Going To Buy Too Many Of These/10

Ömer Ibrahim is a regular contributor to Suppressing Fire and you can check out his modelling work at Can’t Sleep, Must Paint

When Armada was first announced, I’ll have to be honest and say I was always a little sceptical and curious as to what ships FFG could release as follow ups/expansions.  However, I’m pleasantly surprised by Wave 3; introducing as it does two smaller vessels, after the arrivals of the mammoth Imperial Class Star Destroyer and the Home One.  First, let’s take a look at the Rebel Transports.  Inside the blister kit, you get two GR-75 Transports which click onto a single base, so that you end up with something that looks like this:


The miniatures are simple, but this is no bad thing. They’re support vessels, and you don’t want them taking all the attention from your Home One or Mark 2 Assault Frigate.  There’s a nice ink-wash been applied to them to bring out some of the detail, which looks great.

Also included, you get the standard markers to make sure that you don’t run out of any that came with your base set…of course, if you buy everything, much like X-Wing, you’re going to end up with an absolute glut of the bloody things.


And, of course, your speed and command dials for navigating your GR-75s across the battlefield.


The GR-75 can be calibrated one of two ways, you can cast it in a more traditional transport role, or if you’re feeling a little more confrontational, you can fly it as a combat retrofit.


The transport option is the cheaper of the two, with no offensive capabilities, although it has a fairly decent anti-squadron attack. The combat retrofit ups the anti-ship capabilities, at the cost of reducing the power of the anti-squadron weapons. Neither are especially powerful on paper, but they could be a good use of spare points,  with the most expensive clocking in at just 24pts.


What you also get in the pack, of course, is a nice little bunch of enhancements,  including the Legends universe’s General Cracken as an Admiral, who provides a pretty meaty defensive bonus.  Echo Base’s Toryn Farr grants a good re-roll bonus, which could be a good use of a GR-75’s reasonable speed and manoeuvrability.  Also included are a couple of title cards, and what appears to be some abilities that are unique to the Rebel Transports (although I’m expecting some dedicated Armada player to correct me in the comments), offering support to bombers, enhanced communications, and a buff to your repair orders.

The contents of this kit aren’t earth-shattering, but they’re not really supposed to be.  If, on the other hand, you’re looking for some flavour and enhancements to round out your Rebel fleet, then these will definitely have a place in your collection.

Ömer Ibrahim – Suppressing Fire’s painter and modeller extraordinaire- has tasked himself with a new project: fitting a full lighting rig to Fantasy Flight Games’ Outrider model for their astonishingly popular wargame, X-Wing. Let’s see how he gets on:

You can follow Ömer on Twitter at @TheIronTurkOmer and follow his painting/modelling blog at: https://www.facebook.com/CantSleepMustPaint/