Archive for October, 2014

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After the fall of the Roman Empire, Rome has been stripped of its former glory and left desperate to recapture its past.  Prima schemes with all her cunning and spite to see her son declared the new Emperor.  In her way is her husband, a Roman general, who has forged his own deadly path to fulfil his ambitions.  The Lost Legion is a violent tale of manipulation and debauchery in the quest for ultimate power.

The Lost Legion is not, as its cover makes it out to be, a sword-swinging, hack-and-slash action-fest, but rather a slow burning, political thriller, with occasional bursts of extreme sex and violence.  Imagine if Rome did a crossover with Game of Thrones, and you’d be in the right ballpark.

The acting style is a little odd, but not bad.  It seemed at first as though the cast were overacting, but as it progressed it didn’t feel so much overblown, as more if it were stage acting.  In fact, it wouldn’t surprise me at all to learn that The Lost Legion were originally a stage-play, adapted for the screen; or perhaps that the directors had their background in the theatre.

The bursts of sex and violence when they occur are bloody and explicit.  This is by no means a bad thing, as it looks pretty cool on the screen, and that’s what the aim is; although one can’t help but feel some of it is a little childish and merely inserted for titillation.

Production wise, the costumes are excellent and the set-design – while limited by budget – is very good.  Again, this gives it a theatrical minimalist feel, adding to the feeling of adaptation from the stage.

The Lost Legion is an interesting movie if you’re into the senatorial side of Roman history, or just enjoy some Dune/Game of Thrones style political manoeuvring.  Don’t expect to be blown away by anything that’s on offer here, but it’s worth a rental or catching on a digital streaming service to fill a lazy Sunday afternoon.

The Lost Legion is available on DVD in the UK from 20th October 2014 priced £14.99 (Rated “18” for strong gory violence, sex, and sexual violence). 

War Tales

Fred Davis of Englewood graduated from high school in 1942 and immediately signed up for the Army Air Corps during the middle of World War II.

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The Lost Legion Competition

Posted: October 13, 2014 in Ancient, Competitions, DVD

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After the fall of the Roman Empire, Rome has been stripped of its former glory and left desperate to recapture its past.  Urbina Prima schemes with all her cunning and spite to see her son declared the new Emperor.  In her way is her husband, Roman general Maximus, who has forged his own deadly path to fulfil his ambitions.  The Lost Legion is a violent tale of manipulation and debauchery in the quest for ultimate power.

Thanks to our friends at Metrodome Distribution Ltd, we’ve got three copies of The Lost Legion on DVD to give away! For your chance of winning, send your name and full postal address to lostlegioncompetition@yahoo.co.uk before midday on Monday 20th October, making sure to put “The Lost Legion” as the subject. The first three entries out of the electronic hat after the competition closes will receive a copy of this awesome movie!

Don’t forget to put “The Lost Legion” in the subject line. Incorrectly labelled or blank entries will be discarded.

The Lost Legion is available from Monday 20th October, courtesy of Metrodome Distribution Ltd.

In this documentary from the BBC, historian and aerial specialist Ben Robinson traces the first air attacks on Britain by the Zeppelin. From Norfolk to London, Robinson investigates how Germany’s aim – to intimidate the population and bring swift victory – failed. Told through aerial perspective, archive film, expert analysis, 3D graphics, and first person accounts (including that of a 102-year-old lady who still remembers the attacks!).

A nice, light documentary from BBC Four and well worth a watch!

Watch on iPlayer here

Watch on YouTube, here:

Something a little outside of our usual fare, but it’s still wargaming (kinda).  My buddy and former Claymore Division co-host knocked up these pretty nifty custom Heroclix of Michaelangelo, Leonardo, Raphael and Donatello.  Knowing him, I’m pretty sure there’ll be more to follow.

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Phantom Leader: Linebacker

Posted: October 5, 2014 in Gaming, Vietnam War

That’s…well defended…

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MEET THE SPARTANS (PART ONE)

Posted: October 2, 2014 in Ancient

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21

Posted: October 1, 2014 in Books, Cold War, Vietnam War

by Alexander Mladenov

Illustrated by Adam Tooby

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The MiG-21 Fishbed holds the title of the world’s most widely built and used jet fighter, with more than ten thousand units rolling off the lines of three plants in the former Soviet Union.  Designed as a Mach-2 light tactical fighter, its original prototype was first flown in 1958; with the first production variant appearing two short years later.   It was a simplified daytime short-range, clear-weather interceptor and tactical fighter.

This new entry in Osprey Publishing’s Air Vanguard series is a solid one, packed with information, art-work, and in-depth profiles of the inner workings of this iconic fighter.  A solid intro covers all of the base statistics, as well as a very detailed overview of what the cockpit contains, and its layout.

The sections on the armament options on the Fishbed presents us with a solid list of what it could have carried, but I was left feeling that I would have liked a little more information on the actual missiles themselves.  After a while, “Serial Number Blindness” sets in, a little bit of detail on key differences between these weapons would have gone a long way.

As we’ve come to expect from Osprey, the photos and illustrations are superb, with plenty of black and white action shots, load-outs, and some great depictions of the various colour schemes used for those of us who look for painting references for wargaming and modelling.  The research is – as always – second to none.

The latter half of the book is given over to the various wars and forces that used the MiG-21 Fishbed, and it’s a good solid overview, with key areas such as the Vietnam War receiving excellent write ups.

Overall, despite one (very) minor complaints, this is an excellent and highly detailed reference guide to one of Mikoyan-Gurevich’s most iconic craft.

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21 is available now in paperback and Kindle format.